(Source: sh4ne, via pizza)

(Source: peggman, via iouanavenger)

typicaltaurus:

What level did ur dog learn flamethrower

typicaltaurus:

What level did ur dog learn flamethrower

(via hi)

ohsylar:

how the piss do people just become really close friends with popular blogs what the fuck

nikittypaprika:

Yknow when cats do that thing when they unsure of something and they slowly, hesitantly reach out their paw, bat at the thing and then suddenly skitter away in fright?

That is basically how i imagine the team of scientists are with the house that does not exist.

(via pamandab)

jaclcfrost:

do u know how hard it is to love a character that’s an asshole on a regular basis knowing that they’re an asshole and they’ve done asshole things but whenever u look at them u are just like. wow. u asshole. i love u. but u. are an asshole

(via llisabraeden)

missingkitsune:

"There there, I’m sorry I scared you. *pats and kisses* you’re a good dog, good dog."

missingkitsune:

"There there, I’m sorry I scared you. *pats and kisses* you’re a good dog, good dog."

(via the-absolute-funniest-posts)

timefold:

when the teacher asks you to answer the question because you weren’t paying attention but you know the answer

image

(via hi)

In Britain, make-up might have been hard to find, but it was worn with pride and became a symbol of the will to win. ‘Put your best face forward,’ encouraged a 1942 Yadley advertisement in Churchillian tones. ‘War, Woman and Lipstick' ran a celebrated Tangee campaign. Bright red was the favourite wartime colour for lips and nails and lipstick names were often patriotic: Louis Phillippe's Patriotic Red; Fighting Red by Tussy and Grenadier - The new Military red created by Tattoo, effective with air force blue and khaki.

During wartime, a subtle change had taken place in the marketing and the perception of make-up. It was no longer about making a woman seem ‘dainty’, but making her look and feel strong. Rosie the Riveter became a wartime icon in the USA, representing the six million women working in factories for the war effort. [Rockwell] portrayed Rosie as a vast figure in work dungarees, her short sleeves revealing arms the size of prize-winning hams. Behind her hangs the stars and stripes, squashed carelessly under her feet is a copy of Adolf Hitler’s Mein Kampf, and on her mighty lap rests a lunch box and a huge riveting machine like an enormous gun. [Her] henna red curls, lipsticked mouth and painted finger nails stress her femininity, emphasising the fact that make-up too was a weapon of war [Madeleine Marsh, Compact and Cosmetics: Beauty from the Victorian Times to the Present Day]

(Source: reyesrobbies, via ohsylar)